The MagicBox Forums  

Go Back   The MagicBox Forums > General Topics > MagicBox Member Reviews

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-15-2003, 12:19 PM   #151
Kojiro Hyuga
Employed Slave
 
Kojiro Hyuga's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Macau
Posts: 500
Quote:
Originally posted by Icarus4578
I

(..)What I don't like are the violent ones with rape, tentacles, and some rather disturbing other concepts I won't get into. Tokimeki is still my favorite.
Yes, the japanese and the "tentacles"... No, Can Can is of course not as deep as Tokimeki (no minigames ) But its rather funny and "salty"- The other simulations games you mentioned I never really tried, some never heard of!

However, me and my friends played a lot a 4 player multiplayer dating simulation game for the N64 from Hudson called Getter Lover! It was amazing fun! You competed with your friends for a selection of 5 or 6 girls (who obeyed to typical stereotypes such as Sporty girl, Sexy Girl, Bookworm Girl and the tipical "I'm so fragile that I need protection" girl), and during the game you had various minigames such as a 4 player Doom clone, a 4 player "Protect your Girl" game and a Quiz show where you had to answer questions about the girls (changed every time you played!) There was also a very UGLY Girl in the game that appeared randomly at "dating" spots and ruined your game for 3 turns because she stayed with you and spread the rumor she was dating you! An amazing game (the concept was too macho, but I'm not complaining) and great fun if you gather a group of (male) friends! Try it!
__________________
"(...) And Why the hell did I bring Helium, instead of air??"
Kojiro Hyuga is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2003, 01:08 PM   #152
Icarus4578
Deal with it.
 
Icarus4578's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 12,550
Here... try this...

Keith Courage in Alpha Zones - TurboGrafx 16 - Rating 5
That was some Christmas long ago, when my TV was aglow with both Altered Beast and Keith Courage. Sega and NEC got here a year ahead of Nintendo's Super NES so they were the major two new consoles for the year 1990 (SNES came out near the end of the year). I know that EGM gave Sega's crisp 5-MEG home conversion of Capcom's Ghouls N' Ghosts arcade game of the year (and with good reason). So we were enjoying Sega and NEC games while we were waiting for our Mario, Zelda and Final Fantasy fix. Now, NEC lauched with some impressive software and judging from the promotional video I've (still) got they were set to bring over hundreds of titles from over in Japan (in fact, the end of the tape showed off many superb PC Engine titles that never made it out of Japan - so much for that). As a matter of fact, the video demonstrated games like China Warrior side by side with NES games like Kung Fu to show off the TG16's graphic superiority. Funny thing is, Kung Fu is far superior to China Warrior, but Vigilante was pretty good (both Kung Fu and Vigilante are Irem classics).
NEC's TurboGrafx 16 could've made a huge impact in America and set the standard for importing fine Japanese softs. They didn't follow through; with only several dozen decent games released outside Japan (often with lame box cover art) and some bad promotions and lack of a sound strategy vs. big contenders Sega and Nintendo, NEC fell behind the race for 16-bit supremacy (TG16 is an 8-bit system with a 16-bit graphics processor). Not only that, the third-party backing in Japan was nonexistent in other countries, except for a few companies like Working Designs with games like Cosmic Fantasy. We never got big titles like Street Fighter 2 CE, Fatal Fury 2, Konami's Castlevania/Dracula X and Snatcher, etc. and to add insult to injury there wasn't a good lineup of sports titles.
Keith Courage in Alpha Zones stood as one of the foundation titles for the TG16. Featuring clear, bright, colorful visuals complimented by an ingenious game system where you had to use almost Mario-esque platform jumping, attack enemies to collect money, go shopping, buying weapons, items, health and clues, and then using your purchased weapons/items in the Alpha Zones which would come into play during the second action-based half of the stages (there are 8 total). The action gameplay was especially well done. However, problems hamper these stages down a bit. First of all, you have to know that before the second half of each stage you're just in regular form (just Keith and his sword). This part is weak on the action and has more to do with collecting enough money to upgrade your weapon before the second half. And in the action parts you morph into an armor-clad warrior with a plasma blade and bombs (which are actually just projectiles) in which everything is all action. Make your way through the 'always designed the same' stages, destroy enemies and fight a boss. The problem (for me) is the lack of enemy variety. You're sure to fight the same 4-5 enemies over and over each stage (only occassionally adding defeated bosses as enemies). If you don't mind that, and the later stages in which you must collect money for a ridiculous amount of time--say 15-30 minutes--then you can look past its faults moreso than I can and enjoy it. I enjoy it, but to a limited extent. However, it's no less devoid of gameplay than Altered Beast.
The music is a mixed bag. It ranges from standard action flare to kinda silly motifs that actually fit the visuals very well. The sound quality is what you expect from TG16 - crystal smooth. And all of the sound effects are of the same quality.
If you at any point in time owned a TG16 then you already know the deal with Keith Courage in Alpha Zones. It was impressive at that time, but against other stellar 16-bit quality games it just couldn't hold its own. As everybody knows, Hudson Soft was responsible for what was NEC's mascot, Bonk. They missed the boat with KC, but Sega didn't do much better with Altered Beast. However, both have that nostalgic aura hanging around no matter how lackluster both games are on their own.

Here's codes for the game ~ http://www.gamefaqs.com/console/turbo16/code/9684.html
And here's a site with screenshots of games for TG16 (no Keith Courage shots though) ~ http://www.fortunecity.com/marina/in...1211/id215.htm

Last edited by Icarus4578; 03-22-2004 at 10:22 AM.
Icarus4578 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2003, 04:40 PM   #153
Pilotwings
*can't talk...eating*
 
Pilotwings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 1,863
Red face

Quote:
Originally posted by Icarus4578
Go to Page 9 in this thread and you'll see the review for Zelda ~ Wind Waker almost midway down the page.
burn! its the best game for gc and a 10 is the right score.
Pilotwings is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2003, 04:44 PM   #154
Icarus4578
Deal with it.
 
Icarus4578's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 12,550
That's your opinion. There's no way I'm giving Zelda ~ WW a 10. That's reserved for absolute classics like Zelda ~ A Link to the Past, Yoshi's Island, and a few others.

Last edited by Icarus4578; 03-22-2004 at 10:23 AM.
Icarus4578 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2003, 06:41 PM   #155
Icarus4578
Deal with it.
 
Icarus4578's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 12,550
The one and only

Street Fighter II - Arcade - Rating 7
The year - 1991. The place - any choice arcade. A revolution was born. Capcom exploded on the scene and became king of the arcades with just one release - Street Fighter II. For gamers, this was a revelation which had dominated our deepest thoughts, for we were gamers but first and foremost - dreamers. We sought at the very comfort of our homes a taste of that omnipotence, that singular spark that ignited the torch which Capcom kept running with. The crowds of other arcade-making dwellers recoiled in horror of this obstruction that populated arcades with muted simplicity. To all those that layed their hands upon the Street Fighter II cabinet, it had indistinctly become the emulation of their dreams.
Street Fighter II was a sensation for a generation of very fortunate arcade-goers. Players would subject themselves to being confined in a dissolute entrancement for hours and hours. It had everything - it was a complete and total fighting engine. You have three seperate punch buttons and likewise three kicks, ranging from weak to strong. And of course a control stick. It's what happened as a result of certain coordinated stick/button commands that made it work unlike anything else. And it was (undisputably) the astoundingly unique cast of characters and backgrounds which were the foundation of SFII's distinctness of atmosphere. The graphics and animation were unprecedented - they were the best. Who would argue? (who would complain?) It wasn't easy for everybody to hear the memorable compositions emmited from SFII but it was undeniably no less personal in character than the characters themselves. The sound effects were all done with a similar resolve of attained perfection. What was there that SFII did that was wrong? Every game publication found solace in this game - put SFII on the cover, sit back and watch the issue sell millions. The financial success of the arcade in and of itself cannot be comprehended. It was Capcom performing magic and nothing less.
To this day, I remember well the moment I first walked into the local arcade and walked by a new arcade machine titled Street Fighter II...
It has retained its quality and singular presence respectably well. Although it has since been bettered by many other now-classic titles, Street Fighter II will always be the father of fighting games. This, nobody can ever take away.

Last edited by Icarus4578; 09-03-2003 at 10:55 AM.
Icarus4578 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2003, 02:42 AM   #156
Kojiro Hyuga
Employed Slave
 
Kojiro Hyuga's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Macau
Posts: 500
Only 7? O well... Like you said, its YOUR opinion... Oh, about the new avatar....... UUUUUUUAAAAAAATAAAAAAAAHHH!!!!!!! (Ever seen "Shaolin Soccer"?)
__________________
"(...) And Why the hell did I bring Helium, instead of air??"
Kojiro Hyuga is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2003, 08:18 AM   #157
Icarus4578
Deal with it.
 
Icarus4578's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 12,550
'Shaolin Soccer'? I'm afraid to ask. Only a 7 because it has been bettered by many other fighting games (including Capcom's SF sequels like Turbo). I chose to review the original and make a special review that complimented Capcom for making the original king of fighting games. I like the review very much.

Last edited by Icarus4578; 07-19-2003 at 07:45 AM.
Icarus4578 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2003, 03:38 PM   #158
Black Ace
Watching liek a Hwak
 
Black Ace's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 2,971
Quote:
Originally posted by Icarus4578
That's your opinion. There's no way i'm giving Zelda ~ WW a 10. That's reserved for absolute classics like Zelda ~ A Link to the Past, Yoshi's Island, and a few others.
Yoshi's Island -- that game was the ****. Best 2D platformer in my opinion, hopefully Nintendo make another. Yoshi's Story was boring.
Black Ace is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2003, 04:56 PM   #159
markavellie
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 106
I agree with your Kingdom Hearts review...if anythiong it should've scored less. The action is boring and the puzzles are more like running around clueless until you come across what you were looking for.
markavellie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2003, 07:35 PM   #160
Icarus4578
Deal with it.
 
Icarus4578's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 12,550
Staggering quality gaming

Final Fantasy VII - PlayStation - Rating 9
The birth of the 32-bit RPG revival began with one title, and that title was the Squaresoft masterpiece Final Fantasy VII. We had a drought of RPGs in the 16-bit days (at least in America) with only a few chosen RPG releases every now and then. While Square is the main perpetrator of the cinema/movie RPG approach, they also were one of a select few game companies that stood for quality and getting a lot more than you paid for. $50 for 100+ of the best hours spent in gaming, period. I simply cannot find a game on the GC/PS2/X-Box thus far that comes close to this level, including key major titles like Metroid Prime, Zelda WW, Panzer Dragoon Orta, etc. and FF 8 through 10 weren't even close. FFVII was the renaissance of the 32-64-bit era. Others like Dragon Warrior VII and Persona 2 ~ Eternal Punishment, while great in many respects, just weren't quite as engaging.
This FF title featured a bold new world for RPGing. There was the addition of Resident Evil-esque polygon characters over still backdrops, 15-20 FPS fully 3D battles with (at the time) the most dazzling special effects and cinematic, bold summons ever to be seen, a memorable cast of characters, hidden items and a new useful system which required the player to ascertain shiny gems called 'Materia' which could be inserted into weapons and armor to add effects, magic, abilities, summons, and a slew of other features, and a vast world spanning three discs (the last disc is admittedly short in length though). We had never seen an RPG on this scale before.
The story is the weakest part of the game. It revolves around former ShinRa employee turned mercenary-for-hire Cloud Strife and other characters like Tifa and Barret who despise the energy company ShinRa Inc. which is run by shadowy figures known as the Turks. They are sucking the life out of the planet in order to power the huge city Midgar, and Barret, who leads a group of opposition called Avalanche, is so angry about it that he's organized Avalanche to help him take down ShinRa. So he's hired Cloud to help do the dirty work. Cloud doesn't seem to really care for Barret's cause though, and this frusturates Barret to no end. The story extends way past Midgar and these three characters and (of course) eventually becomes the 'save the world' stuff seen a thousand times before. The story is a little weak...
...But the game itself is just so high-quality that it more than amends for the disingenuous storyline. This is the first FF title to reduce the amount of characters in battle from 4 to 3. But this only made each character stand out more. The actual fighting system is the same as previous FF titles with several additions, especially the new berserk meter for each character. As a character is hit the meter builds until it finally hits its peak thus enabling the character to perform a Limit Break attack. Another interesting addition was the new cinematic summons which were jaw-dropping at that time. Also, there were hidden bosses added for the US release called Weapons -- ultra-powerful bosses that were scattered in the world. They were even tougher than the final boss! Oh, and there's all those FMV cinemas which were the best at that time.
The game is not without flaws. While not in battle, the characters look blocky and -- just admit it -- stupid, the final area is the worst-designed in the game, and some of the later summons take too long. There's a few more faults here and there, but the positives far outweigh the negatives.
The music is all composed by Nobuo Uematsu (FFVII was his first project since his little mid-life crisis) and it includes around 100 songs. While the sound quality is rather dull, a lot of the music compositions are very nicely composed. I'm not as big a fan of the final boss music--One-Winged Angel--as most other people seem to be. The sound effects are done well with a few here and there being a bit weak. Overall, it's an accomplished soundtrack, especially when you consider it all had to be composed and arranged within such a short time span (about a year or so).
This was the game that catapulted Sony into the stratosphere - way past Sega Saturn which I think is every bit as great a system. It's amazing to think that not too long before the release of FFVII critics and game companies were saying that RPGing wasn't a good decision for the US market. Square proved them all wrong.

Last edited by Icarus4578; 03-22-2004 at 10:27 AM.
Icarus4578 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2003, 05:53 PM   #161
Icarus4578
Deal with it.
 
Icarus4578's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 12,550
Hey, that's not Phantasy Star....

Surging Aura - Mega Drive - Rating 6
Let me begin with a header on an advertisement from Sega - "Live Out Your Fantasies with Role Playing Games from Sega, the Leader of RPGs". This was back in the time when Shining in the Darkness was released (an awesome dungeon crawler-styled RPG), and after Phantasy Star II won video game of the year by Video Games and Computer Entertainment magazine. So then, what happened to Sega? Later into the Genesis lifecycle they began ignoring the RPG market, claiming that it wasn't worth Sega of America's effort. What was interesting to note was that in Japan circa 1994 there were two RPG titles going head-to-head for the honor of RPG of the year - Final Fantasy VI (Square) and Phantasy Star IV (Sega). Both are great games that deserved attention. During the period they were to be released in America, FFVI was getting more attention and hype than PSIV and this (in 100% truth) was unfair to Sega since they predetermined Square's title to be RPG of the year. Even if you felt that FFVI was better, PSIV was a landmark title for Genesis owners everywhere and, if it was given more attention, could've boosted Sega sales (and confidence, apparently). Since FFVI received unprecedented coverage, with PSIV being forced to play keep-up... Sega lost the race.
Which means we never got Sega/Mutsumi Inomata's Surging Aura, a fun spinoff of the Phantasy Star series. As a matter of fact, besides a slightly changed battling system, it uses the same game engine as PSIV. The game opens with some rather tasty artwork in the vein of other Sega RPGs. Strange enough, it feels like something out of Sonic Software Planning - the look, the music, the presentation, etc. It's all so similar. After a rather stellar opening sequence with cinemas interlaced within, the quest begins. Unfortunately I don't know what the story is about (I don't understand Japanese) but it has something to do with books that kingdoms are after (not unlike Ys). The main character is a magician that winds up being joined by an assorted crew of people, including a pirate, a couple male and female warriors, etc. but there is only a maximum of two with you at any given time. You gain magic by either finding it in chests, having somebody give you it, or buying it. Here's the thing: only the main character can use magic and everybody else can only do standard things (attack, defend, items, etc.) The battle system is slightly changed from PS series in that you see the character faces and underneath the HP/MP is displayed like an energy bar. There are commands shown and when you select one it begins to build. Upon completion the desired command is executed. What's annoying is when you want to cast certain spells. You select a spell from one of six orbs (I guess that's what they are) and you watch the spell being cast (like in Final Fantasy II for SNES). But if your main character gets hit the spell casting will halt momentarily. During this small interval of time, if he's hit again the spell is cancelled and you'll have to re-decide what you want to do. Fortunately, the enemy must follow the same procedure for casting spells. But unfortunately for you, sometimes there are two rows of enemies - one in the front row and one in the back - and in order to attack the ones in the back you'll need to do one of several things in time ~ A) kill off all the front row enemies so it forces the back row to come forward, B) use a long-range weapon, or C) get off a magic attack in time. It's a great idea for strategy in an RPG, but it's not done as well as it should've been.
The game itself is your generic RPG adventure. You go from town to town with very little backtracking, and almost every town looks the same. There are castles and such, but even here they look too similar to one another. It's not a big issue as far as I'm concerned. The game is very easy to understand even if you don't know Japanese. Some spots will make you go "Hmmm..." but with all the battling you'll do, you're sure to be a powerhouse for whatever else comes your way by the time you've figured out what to do next. There's a generous assortment of baddies and most are designed very well (as are the backgrounds) but they don't animate. Also, if you're in favor of PS-style cutscenes during the game, you won't find them here. What you've got here is generic RPGing in the style of PS but not quite on the same level.
The music is very similar to games like Shining Force and Shining in the Darkness with some great tracks here and there. It's got that old classic Sega feel about it which I'm in favor of. The sound effects are done quite well too. A good effort aurally.
Looking back at an old editorial in Sega Visions magazine (Fall 1991 issue), I'm reminded of why I am a game player to begin with. Excerpt: "Our games are always breaking technological ground, testing the waters of new techniques, and blasting past creative limits. You're playing video games for a good time, right? And that's exactly what Sega's technically complex, creatively outrageous games deliver." That may have been true in 1991 when Sega was putting their feet in the door, but how much changes in just a few years. I recommend Surging Aura for those of you that want to play something that will stimulate Sega nostalgia, but don't go into it thinking you'll be blown away.

Have a quick look ~ http://www.vgmuseum.com/pics5/surging.html
Have another ~ http://www.geocities.com/opcfg3/aurareview.html

Last edited by Icarus4578; 08-03-2004 at 10:24 AM.
Icarus4578 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2003, 10:10 AM   #162
Icarus4578
Deal with it.
 
Icarus4578's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 12,550
Two ninjas, dueling in the shade of the moon....

Ninja Gaiden - NES - Rating 8
Forever a classic, Tecmo's grand series Ninja Gaiden has stood the tests of time because of not only its unique presentation and singular flair, but because it was the first such game for a home console to actually have challenging gameplay and great design to fit in perfectly with its inherently cinematic getup. The third Ninja Gaiden was a tremendous letdown, but the first and second were nothing short of greatness.
$60. That's how much Ninja Gaiden costed when it was first released on the NES in America. Everybody knows Ninja Gaiden's story by now. All sorts of people, from the old-school gamers to the newer swarm of go-getters, hell, even people living on the plains of Africa have heard the legendary tale of the Hayabusa clan's struggle to keep the light and dark statues apart. Ryu takes up the Dragon Sword to avenge the sudden death of his father Ken who was killed in a duel. But before he can avenge his death he must find out why his father had to die. Ninja Gaiden opens with a cinema, ends every stage with a cinema, and of course ends the game with a cinema. A whole community of parties get involved in the story throughout the game. The cinemas are done very well and display some of the best graphics seen on the NES. Animation wise, they're sparse. But what do you expect? This isn't a CD/DVD cinema; this is a video game. The stages are very well designed and will test your innermost game performance to the max with split-second timing on jumps and wall-latching, challenging enemies made more challenging by their often awkward placement around the often difficult to transverse stages (plus the age-old problem of reappearing enemies), and the bosses, particularly the battle with the sinuous bastard Jacquio - all adds up to one feisty challenge that will rock even adequately experienced gamers to the core. If you lose to the end boss even once you'll have to repeat the entire last stage, which is long and duly difficult. Good luck.
The gameplay is terrific for an action game, and whatever difficulties you may face with controlling Ryu only punctuate the neccessity of you playing with a higher purpose. You want to win. The game pulls a cheat on you sometimes but you learn to overcome it like everything else. You can jump and hang on walls, and you'll have to learn how to do small jumps off of walls and land on the same wall to keep going higher so that you can then jump onto some other ledge. And of course you can duck, attack with the Dragon Sword, and obtain weapons and useful items like invincibility and 1ups. In the event that you have to continue within a stage, you will have to return to the beginning and do it over again. Sorry, no instant gratification here. If you want to beat this game you'll have to earn it.
Ninja Gaiden boasts one of the most memorable soundtracks to come out of the 8-bit era, and indeed is better composed music than any game to come out over the past couple of years (aside from a select few, like Dragon Quest VII). Every single piece fits the game perfectly and helps accentuate the drama of the moment wherever neccessary. Even the sound effects are memorabilia in and of themselves. I can stay away from this game for several years and still remember how it sounds. You know it has a personality all its own.
I don't know if Team Ninja has what it takes to muster the creative level on par with the first (or second) installment of Ninja Gaiden for Ryu's X-Box debut, but whatever the case, you cannot afford to miss this genuine classic.
For those of you with a SNES, you can try and locate the Ninja Gaiden Trilogy cart which has all three NG titles (with very slight graphic/sound upgrades) on one handy cart, but it's rare. Good thing I've got a copy.

Here's a site with a couple of photos of NG ~ http://www.nesplayer.com/reviews/ninjagaidenr.htm
Here's a site with the front/back of many NES games, including NG ~ http://www.emucamp.com/jagsvgz/syste...res/games.html
Here's in-game sprites ~ http://www.nesplayer.com/database/sp...injagaiden.htm Go figure.
And here's a listing of in-game sprites for other titles ~ http://www.nesplayer.com/database/sprites/ Enjoy.

Last edited by Icarus4578; 03-22-2004 at 10:34 AM.
Icarus4578 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2003, 10:59 PM   #163
gearhound1
Banned
 
gearhound1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 1,955
icarus, are you slacking off again? what's up?
gearhound1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2003, 08:15 AM   #164
Icarus4578
Deal with it.
 
Icarus4578's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 12,550
I can be.... R P G....

RPG Maker - PlayStation - Rating 6
Have you ever wanted to create your own RPG (and have lots of free time to spare)? Then you owe it to yourself to purchase a copy of Agetec's RPG Maker for PS. This is a quality product that gives players full control over virtually every aspect of designing an RPG. Everything, from graphics and animation, to town/dungeon design and story/event writing... it's all here at your fingertips. You've never been given so much freedom of creativity before -- absolutely unprecedented. It'll cost you a bit of time and dedication, so be sure that you have the time necessary.
The game is divided into two sections - RPG Maker, where the game is structured and put together, and the Anime maker, where you can alter/create your own sprites, characters, enemies, backgrounds, etc. and animate things. The Anime section takes a long time to get down, and you really should have a mouse and some prior experience with a PC before going into this section. The RPG section is where you do all of the actual game designing, putting everything together. It's easy enough to design your own RPG universe by using the sprites and characters already preset in the game (don't worry, there's quite a lot for you to utilize). Creating events and causing action/reaction takes some trial and error (bug testing) but once you get it all down you're hooked. You can set up the opening/title screen to come up at whatever point(s) you want. You can adjust character stats and leveling, and fully adjust enemies in a similar manner, including their name, stats and abilities, what items they drop, what they can/cannot do, etc. down to the smallest detail. You can really get into the director's seat and design events that have a lot going on on-screen, such as screen/color fading, characters coming and going, what everybody says (and you can even adjust wait time between whatever you want to the 0.0 point of a second!), move the screen, etc. Virtually everything you can think of is possible. Heck, you can design your own spell effects! I could go on forever but I think you get the idea. The graphics department is decidedly SNES quality (somewhere between Final Fantasy II and Illusion of Gaia) with simple yet fulfilling sprites and animation. The enemies are as detailed as virtually anything in the 2D RPG realm. Excellent. :bigsmile: You'll never be at a loss for coming up with some great new aspects to your storyline; your imagination is pretty much the limit. Just think: you can make an RPG where you play as workers for a game company and must come up with the ultimate game system in order to defeat the evil Sony Empire. Throughout the quest, you must do some 'bug testing' by fighting enemy viruses inside of your games while combating the evil Sony henchmen that keep trying to raid your offices. When you defeat Sony, Microsoft comes in and tries to buy you out!

At last! A game that has the capabilities you're looking for.

You save the actual world design in system data, and the story/event design in the scenario data. These together take up at least two blocks on your memory card, and you'll be suprised as to just how much can be saved onto a mere two blocks of memory. If the game is getting sizey it will start taking up a bit more memory but most of the memory is taken up if you should decide to use the Anime Maker to an extent. If you want to, you can design an RPG world and several scenarios, and then mix and match them as you please.
The music selection is rather nice to boot. You can utilize different songs at whatever points you so choose to, and some of them are very nicely composed pieces that are reminiscent of older RPGs. And, of course, you have sound effects at your disposal as well. There's also a pre-designed miniature RPG for you to enjoy and its purpose is to help you come to grips with the 'how to's' of RPG creation.
I cannot recommend RPG Maker enough. If you invest a good 20+ hours of programming/designing/writing/bug testing, you'd be suprised what you can do. And if you want to truly create an epic, mammoth RPG that is possible as well. Finally, an RPG where the player is truly in absolute control. However, beware the amount of time and work that it requires.

Last edited by Icarus4578; 10-10-2004 at 08:45 AM.
Icarus4578 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2003, 09:15 AM   #165
Icarus4578
Deal with it.
 
Icarus4578's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 12,550
Don't let the bloodsuckers bite

Castlevania ~ Symphony of The Night - PlayStation - Rating 9
I walked into my local Toys R Us one day, then walked out one lucky guy. I just bought the last copy of Castlevania ~ SoTN for PS and didn't feel the least bit guilty about it. Considered by many the greatest PS action/adventure game ever made, SoTN is certainly among the best gaming has to offer.

Here's some math for you~
Konami + 2D = Genius

What else is new...?

SoTN stars Alucard, Dracula's son whose name is his father's spelled in reverse. One of the Belmonts, Richter, has disappeared within Dracula's compound, and Alucard goes to the rescue. So why is Dracula's son helping a Belmont out? Play it and find out. One thing that may get on some people's nerves is the voice acting which, although it is crystal clear, is done rather nonprofessional in my opinion. But that's a small fault in an otherwise stellar gameplay experience.
The game is laid out like Super Metroid ~ you fill in a large castle map as you progress, and you can backtrack, find and use items, weapons, magic, transformations, etc. and basically explore while taking on bats, skeletons, and all sorts of other foes. The animation is superb, especially on Alucard, and Konami infused the PlayStation (and the Saturn version) with some of the sharpest 2D graphics yet seen even to this day. The Saturn import version has two extra areas with that many new bosses, but in all truth those stages are poorly designed as are the bosses within, and add little to the overall experience. You can play as Alucard, Richter and Maria from the outset in the Saturn version (as opposed to the PS version where you have to imput the name Richter at the beginning in order to play as him throughout the game, and you cannot play as Maria) but it's nothing to get overly excited about. The PS version has sharper graphics, transparencies, and better audio quality, but the Saturn version has more songs (such as redone classics like Bloody Tears) and allows you to access the sound test from the outset as opposed to the PS version in which you must first beat the game and then make it to the library in the subsequent quest.
In terms of game design, SoTN is unmatched by other actioners save for several like Super Metroid which is undeniably the best of this style of gameplay to date. In terms of action it doesn't get much better though. Alucard has HP and MP like in an RPG and can even gain levels to build his stats up. Every single weapon you equip has its own feel, and many have a special attack you can do by imputting a special command (a-la a fighting game special move). Some even have special uses like the Rainbow Sword which turns enemies into gems you can sell at the library for a ton o' money. Others include nunchaku, fighting gloves, all sorts of swords and other cleaving devices, and more. There are also armors, cloaks, and boots you can equip to further his stats. Some of these also have special functions. Money is used in the library shop to buy all sorts of useful weapons, armor, and other goodies. I don't know what a shop is doing in Dracula's domain, but who's complaining? You also collect food and items throughout, and even gain the assistance of helpers called Familiars which can help Alucard fend off enemies and even open up secret areas by hitting switches out of Alucard's reach. They can even level-up and get stronger! There's also special relics you can use that do several things such as the Leap Stone which allows you to double-jump. There's so much to explore and find, and so many enemies to fight that it will keep anybody busy for at least a dozen hours or so. And then there's the second castle...
The music is some of the finest you'll ever hear coming from a game system and is indeed far superior to any game soundtrack I've heard yet from the new system software. All new tracks include the rocking symphonic entree into Dracula's castle by Alucard titled fittingly Dracula's Castle, the booming basslines and the echoed piano of Crystal Tears, and plenty of other excellent tracks that makes most movie soundtracks seem like a bad joke in comparison. Actually, most movies nowadays don't have good soundtracks at all and sound stiff because the composers have nothing better to do than to rip off themes, motifs, and such from the works of famous and obscure composers that actually came up with their own musical ideas. There is a fine line between influence and blatant ripping off. Castlevania sounds like Castlevania, and that's a good thing.
There aren't that many new games that I would consider to be classic. But Castlevania ~ SoTN is classic and then some. Thank you Konami. As long as there is a Konami there is going to be more Castlevania titles for us to sink our teeth into (no pun intended).

Last edited by Icarus4578; 10-10-2004 at 08:47 AM.
Icarus4578 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:36 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.